Shootout at the Selma Hotel-Part 2

Movie cowboy James (Yakima Jim) Anson was shot to death at the Selma Hotel in Hollywood on August 9, 1925; and the shooter was either Tom Bay or Edward (Red) Carmichael. Because each of the suspects was pointing his finger at the other, no one was sure which of the men had actually pulled the trigger.

SELMA SHOOTOUT1On August 11, 1925 the Coroner’s Jury heard testimony from a number of witnesses. Among them was LAPD Detective Lieutenant Clark who stated that following his arrest Bay told him: “I was passing the Selma Yotel and Yakima Jim called me up. I went into his room and found him there with a gun in his lap. I saw two or three fellows there. I asked Yakima, ‘What’s the trouble?’ and Yakima said, ‘You know what’s the trouble.’ I saw he was shot and thought I was being framed on, so I got out.” The scenario was at odds with Carmichael’s version which had he and Bay visiting Yakima’s room together–no one else was there when they arrived. According to Carmichael he had stepped out of the room for a moment leaving Bay and Yakima alone. He was certain he’d heard Yakima say. “Put down the gun.” Carmichael returned to the room when he heard a shot and saw Bay climbing out of the hotel window. Yakima was still alive and there was a gun on the floor. Carmichael recognized it as his own weapon. He didn’t know how it had come to be there so he picked it up and was about to leave the room when police arrived. The cops were conveniently next door at the Hollywood Station.SELMA SHOOTOUT2

E.D. Musselman, another cinema cowpoke and a roomer in Bay’s home, testified that Bay arrived home at 4 p.m. on the day of the shooting and he was completely soused. Musselman said Bay was so drunk he was barely able to talk and muttered something unintelligible about Yakima Jim being hurt.

An intriguing piece of the puzzle was supplied by A.J. Antela, a Hollywood jail trusty, who testified that he found $340 in bills on the ground beneath Anson’s window. The money was important was because Bay complained of losing $440 in denominations matching the found money, so it lent credibility to Carmichael’s version of events. The inquest panel never heard the theory that the shooting was tied to Bay’s failed attempt to borrow money from Yakima; nor did they hear that Yakima had allegedly said some nasty things about Bay’s wife.

bay wife picIn his testimony Detective Lieutenant Clark stated that Yakima Jim revealed that he had been shot by “Tom Bay with Red Carmichael’s gun.” Generally a dying declaration is given a lot of weight, and this one was pretty damned clear, yet the jury couldn’t reach a conclusion. They returned with a open verdict–meaning they couldn’t affix blame to either Bay or Carmichael and settled for accusing “some party or parties unknown.”

A couple of days following the inquest Bay and Carmichael were in front of Judge Russell for arraignment. The Coroner’s jury was unable to name the shooter so it was going to be up to a judge and/or jury to try to figure it out.

The defendants’ attorneys, Phillips and Kendall, excoriated the cops for failing to produce the ragged, bloody shirt worn by Yakima when he was shot to death. The defense contended that the shirt would show that Yakima was shot during a struggle–not murdered in cold blood. Attorney Kendall shouted at the prosecution: “You have brought everything connected with the case into court, but you didn’t bring the shirt. Why? I’ll tell you why. Because it shows evidence of a terrific struggle having taken place before Jim was killed, evidence that will exonerate these defendants of the charge of murder.”

The judge postponed the hearing to give everyone an opportunity to deal with the mystery of the missing shirt. Bay and Carmichael were handcuffed to each other to be returned to lock-up. As they were being led from the courtroom Bay’s sobbing wife rushed to his side begging that cops: “Handcuff me to him and take me to jail.” The officers declined.

Was evidence that might clear Bay and Carmichael being deliberately withheld? The hunt for the red shirt was on.

NEXT TIME: Sorting out the shooter. The red shirt mystery solved.

Film Noir Friday: The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery

ST LOUIS BANK ROBBERY

Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is THE GREAT ST. LOUIS BANK ROBBERY, starring Steve McQueen.  Enjoy the movie!

TCM says:

In St. Louis, Missouri, former college football star George Fowler joins three ex-convicts, John Egan, Willie and Gino, in a plot to rob the town bank. Gino vouches for the novice crook George, but does not reveal to the woman-hating Egan that the younger man once dated his sister Ann. Resentful of George’s inclusion in the scheme, Willie, whose long-time association with Egan began when they met as prison inmates, grows angrier when Egan assigns George his usual role as getaway driver. Egan tells the men that they must case the bank for the next few days in order to learn the bank’s daily routine. Then, wary of George’s commitment to the scheme, Egan takes him to steal a license plate to use for their car. Later, when George and Gino realize they have no money, Gino orders George to contact Ann and ask her for a loan.

 

Shootout at the Selma Hotel

There was a time when Los Angeles was a wild west outpost. Cowboys rode into town and got into trouble. They drank too much, chased women, and often drew a gun without contemplating the consequences. But by 1925 the city was modern and civilized, after a fashion, and the only cowpokes to be seen were likely on their way to a movie studio for a day of dress-up and make believe.

On August 9, 1925 Edward “Red” Carmichael and Thomas Bay, both movie cowboys, called on another film cowpoke, James Anson (aka Yakima Jim), at his hotel room. The Selma Hotel was adjacent to the LAPD’s Hollywood station.

LAPD's Hollywood Station.  [Photo courtesy of LAPL

LAPD’s Hollywood Station. [Photo courtesy of LAPL]

Anson, Bay, and Carmichael may have been in the movies but they were more than rhinestone cowboys–they had credibility. Yakima Jim was from the Yakima Reservation in Washington, and Red was a range rider from Texas. Bay was a western showman who hailed from Oklahoma.

Famous Players Lasky [Photo found at http://www.hollywoodlegends.net/paramount.html]

Famous Players Lasky [Photo found at http://www.hollywoodlegends.net/paramount.html]

The three men had recently worked together at the Famous Players-Lasky ranch on a picture, The Pony Express, directed by James Cruze. There had been some discord–Bay intended to confront his fellow movie buckaroo about some nasty remarks Yakima had allegedly made about Bay’s wife.

PONY EXPRESSAll three men had been drinking and the confrontation went from verbal to violent in short order. At least one gunshot was were heard and a man was seen jumping from a second-story window at the rear of the hotel. It wasn’t known who had fired the shot nor was the identity of the jumper known until LAPD Detectives arrived at the scene.

Yakima was conscious but in bad shape. One shot had entered his body under his right arm pit, traveled through both lungs and then exited under his left arm. He was immediately transported to the Receiving hospital. When Detectives questioned him he said that Bay had shot him. When asked why Yakima said that the man was “…just trying to be tough, I guess.”

Detectives brought Bay and Carmichael in for questioning. Bay clammed up. Mrs. Bay appeared at the police station and gave a statement in which she said that the disagreement between her husband and Yakima was about money. Yakima had asked Bay to loan him $25. Mrs. Bay nixed the plan, evidently believing that Yakima was a bad risk. Yakima didn’t take the rejection well at all; he supposedly said to Anson: “You wouldn’t let that bitch tell you what do to, would you?” It was not surprising that Mrs. Bay supported her husband’s story–but what was Red’s role in the shooting?

Red claimed not to know the nature of the beef between Yakima and Bay. He said he’d left the hotel room for a moment but the crack of a gunshot brought him back in a hurry. He witnessed Bay jumping out of the window of the room and saw Yakima on the floor bleeding. He said he was very surprised to see his own gun, which he thought was in one of his suitcases, on the floor. Was Red telling the truth? Bay denied shooting Yakima and waggled his j’accuse finger squarely at Red.

SELMA SHOOTOUT1While cops weren’t looking Bay climbed out of a window at the Hollywood Police Station shimmied down a small pipe and fled. Fifty officers were immediately dispatched to find him. He was recaptured in Whitley Heights in the Hollywood foothills. His escape was a dumb move but it wasn’t the worst of his problems–Yakima had died in the Receiving Hospital.

Now it was murder case. But who was the shooter?

NEXT TIME: Sorting out the facts in the Selma Hotel shootout.

Film Noir Friday: A Night For Crime [1943]

a-night-for-crime-movie-poster-1943-1020458053

Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is A NIGHT FOR CRIME starring Glenda Farrell and Lyle Talbot. Enjoy the movie!

TCM says:

One night in Hollywood, Joe Powell, the publicity director of Motion Picture Associates Studio, visits his girl friend, reporter Susan Cooper, at her apartment, and arrives during a blackout. When they hear a woman’s scream, they go across the hall and find neighbor Ellen Smith strangled to death in her apartment. The building’s switchboard operator tells policeman Hoffman that Ellen tried to phone the police but never finished her call.

Death of the Two Day Bride

clements_lucilleValentine’s Day is coming up, love is in the air, and heart-shaped cards and sweet treats are everywhere. Sadly not all love affairs remain heart shaped, sometimes they become triangles, and when they do  they can be deadly.

Thirty-seven-year-old grocery clerk Worth Clements traveled from Atlanta, Georgia to Los Angeles to plead with his estranged sweetheart, twenty-seven-year-old Lucille Register, to marry him. He brought with him Lucille’s eight-year-old brother Stanley, whom he had adopted. Worth had divorced his former wife, one of Lucille’s aunts, and planned to marry Lucille as soon as possible.

The meeting between Worth and Lucille didn’t go well. Accompanied by two of her friends Mary Temple, Martha Hillhouse, and her brother Stanley, she went to LAPD’s Hollywood station for a safe place to talk things over with Worth. Their talk ended with Worth agreeing to return to Atlanta. The group left the police station and everyone piled into Martha’s car.

As Martha turned the car onto Third Street Worth and Lucille, together in the back seat of the car, began to argue. It was then that Lucille dropped the bombshell. She was already married! She and a fellow named Wayne Campbell had driven to Tijuana just two days earlier and wed. The other occupants of the car heard Lucille reject Worth in no uncertain terms: “I won’t marry you–take it or leave it.”

Worth responded: “Lucille, I’ve got a gun.”  Did he bring the gun because he suspected he was part of a triangle? Or had he planned to kill Lucille if she rejected him for any reason? I suspect the latter; but surely Lucille’s confession was the thing that made him snap. He fired one shot into Lucille and she went quiet. Martha pulled the car to the curb at 3rd Street and Union Avenue. As Martha, Mary and Stanley ran for help they heard two more shots.

When the police arrived they found Lucille dead in the back seat. Beside her lay Worth. He had put two rounds into his chest and was barely alive.

LAPD Detective Thad Brown went to the hospital to speak with Worth. As soon as it was clear that he was going to pull through, he was charged with murder.

Little more than a month following the slaying Worth appeared in Judge Blake’s courtroom. He made a pathetic picture swaddled in a blanket, hunched over in a wheelchair. He pleaded guilty, even though he insisted he couldn’t recall committing the crime.

worth_wheelchairOn December 29, 1937, Judge Blake found Worth guilty of first degree murder and sentenced him to life in prison.  But he didn’t spend the rest of his life behind bars. He was released on January 29, 1948, ten years to the day after he began his sentence.

Wanna Buy A Story?

Frank Lovejoy with Betty Winkler and director, Himan Brown

Frank Lovejoy with Betty Winkler and director, Himan Brown

From February 6, 1950 to September 25, 1952, Frank Lovejoy starred as Randy Stone in the NBC radio series Night Beat.  The series was sponsored by Pabst Blue Ribbon beer and Wheaties breakfast cereal.

On September 18, 1950 at the end of the episode entitled Wanna Buy a Story? Frank Lovejoy was presented with an award by none other than Aggie Underwood. At the time Aggie was only a few years in to her post as City Editor of the Evening Herald and Express.  Her autobiography, Newspaperwoman, had been out for about a year before this episode of Night Beat aired, and it was a great opportunity for her to plug the book.

According to Wikipedia, Ripperologist editor Paul Begg offered this description of the series:

Broadcast on NBC, Nightbeat… starred Frank Lovejoy as Randy Stone, a tough and streetwise reporter who worked the nightbeat for the Chicago Star, looking for human interest stories. He met an assortment of people, most of them with a problem, many of them scared, and sometimes he was able to help them, sometimes he wasn’t. It is generally regarded as a “quality” show, and it stands up extremely well. Frank Lovejoy (1914–1962) isn’t remembered today, but he was a powerful and believable actor with a strong delivery, and his portrayal of Randy Stone as tough guy with humanity was perfect. The scripts were excellent, given that they had to cover much in a short time. There was a good supporting cast, orchestra and sound effects. “The Slasher,” broadcast on 10 November 1950, the last show of season one, has a very loosely Ripper-derived plot in which Stone searches for an artist.
For those of you who enjoy old radio shows, like I do, I recommend Night Beat–in fact here’s the episode with Aggie’s brief appearance. If you don’t want to listen to the entire show you can catch Aggie at about 27:21.
Enjoy!

Film Noir Friday: Two Dollar Bettor [1951]

twodollarbettor

Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is TWO-DOLLAR BETTOR starring John Litel, Marie Windsor and Steve Brodie–also in the cast is Carl Switzer (Alfalfa in the Our Gang comedies). Betting on the ponies is obviously a slippery slope leading from the track to the morgue. Enjoy the movie!

TCM says:

Despite his initial reluctance, family man and widower John Hewitt places a two-dollar bet at his first visit to the race track and wins. With brother-in-law George Irwin’s guidance and racing statistics, John continues betting and wins a down payment on new car for his daughters, seventeen-year-old Nancy and eighteen-year-old Diane. As comptroller of the Langston Bank, John earns a moderate living and has acquired some savings. Wanting to provide more for his daughters, John begins to place regular bets with bookie Krueger and arranges to meet Krueger’s associate, Mary Slate, each week to settle his account. Over the next few months, John’s obsession with the track grows as he successfully bets on jockey Osborne. When Osborne is injured; however, John’s winning streak ends and he soon loses most of his savings.