Film Noir Friday: A Night For Crime [1943]

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Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is A NIGHT FOR CRIME starring Glenda Farrell and Lyle Talbot. Enjoy the movie!

TCM says:

One night in Hollywood, Joe Powell, the publicity director of Motion Picture Associates Studio, visits his girl friend, reporter Susan Cooper, at her apartment, and arrives during a blackout. When they hear a woman’s scream, they go across the hall and find neighbor Ellen Smith strangled to death in her apartment. The building’s switchboard operator tells policeman Hoffman that Ellen tried to phone the police but never finished her call.

Film Noir Friday: A Stranger in Town [1943]

stranger in townWelcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.

Tonight’s feature is, A STRANGER IN TOWN, starring Frank Morgan, Richard Carlson, and Jean Rogers.

Enjoy the movie!

 TCM says:

After instructing his secretary, Lucy Gilbert, not to reveal his destination to anyone, John Josephus Grant, a cantankerous U.S. Supreme Court justice, embarks on an overdue duck hunting vacation. On his first day out, Joe is confronted by Orrin Todds, a game inspector, who demands to see his hunting license and then informs him that he needs a local stamp, which will cost him five dollars, plus a “tip.” Annoyed, Joe refuses to pay Orrin and, without revealing his occupation, accompanies him to court in nearby Crownport. Citing the letter of the law, the judge, Austin Harkley, upholds Orrin’s actions and fines Joe $100. Later, at the Crownport barbershop, Joe encounters young lawyer Bill Adams, who is running for mayor, and Jim Connison, the crooked incumbent, with whom Harkley is in cahoots.

Film Noir Sunday Matinee: Alias Boston Blackie [1942] & After Midnight With Boston Blackie [1943]

I’ve been crazy busy the last couple of weeks so I slept right through Film Noir Friday! But the projector is back up and running, the popcorn machine is heating up and the sodas are chilled.

Put your feet up and get ready to enjoy a double feature.

Since it’s Sunday I thought it would be nice to offer a light weight film selection. So find a seat and join me in the Deranged L.A. Crimes screening room for a couple of WWII era BOSTON BLACKIE films starring Chester Morris.

Our first feature is ALIAS BOSTON BLACKIE.

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TCM says:

Prompted by the sentiment of Christmas, reformed safecracker Boston Blackie persuades the cast of a musical comedy company to help him entertain the inmates at his “alma mater,” the state prison. The stars of the troupe are Roggi McKay, the famous clown, and a young dancer, Eve Sands, whose brother, Joe Trilby, is an inmate at the institution. Eve is anxious to see her brother, who was jailed on false evidence and who now he seeks revenge on Duke Banton and cab driver Steve Caveroni, the two men who framed him.

http://youtu.be/c5AgY4mTLro?list=PL5TUHC5E_gjcmy08vKChSLRyVDzwHfiWs

TIME FOR INTERMISSION!  YOU KNOW WHAT THAT MEANS–LET’S ALL GO TO THE LOBBY!

Now for our second BOSTON BLACKIE feature, AFTER MIDNIGHT WITH BOSTON BLACKIE.

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When Diamond Ed Barnaby is paroled from prison after serving a sentence for stealing diamonds, his fellow gang members, Joe Herschel, Sammy Walsh and Marty Beck, spring into action to reclaim the jewels. Anticipating trouble from Herschel and his gang, Diamond Ed tells his daughter Betty that he must leave town but will meet her at the Arcade Building on Friday. After retrieving the gems, Diamond Ed locks them in a safe deposit box at the Arcade Building, intending to give them to Betty. Several days later, a porter with a telegram for reformed jewel thief Boston Blackie pages him on a train. Inspector Farraday, Blackie’s nemesis, who is also a passenger on the train, identifies himself as Blackie and accepts the telegram.

Film Noir Friday: The Lady of Burlesque [1943]

lady of burlesque

Welcome!  The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is the LADY OF BURLESQUE (aka THE G-STRING MURDERS) directed by William Wellman and starring Barbara Stanwyck and Michael O’Shea.

The film was based on the novel The G-String Murders written by strip tease queen Gypsy Rose Lee (with ghost-writing assistance from mystery writer Craig Rice). If you’re not familiar with Craig Rice, she was the author of mystery novels and short stories, sometimes described as “the Dorothy Parker of detective fiction.” She was the first mystery writer to appear on the cover of Time Magazine, on January 28, 1946.

Turner Classic Movies says:

S. B. Foss, owner of the Old Opera House on Broadway in New York City, promotes his new recruit, burlesque dancer Dixie Daisy, hoping that she will draw a large audience. Dixie’s performance draws cheers from the crowds and from comedian Biff Brannigan, who ardently admires Dixie even though she hates comics because of past experiences with them. When someone cuts the wire to the light backstage that signals the presence of the police, the performers are surprised by a raid, and pandemonium ensues. As Dixie flees through a coal chute, someone grabs her from behind and tries to strangle her, but her assailant escapes when a stagehand comes along.

Film Noir Friday: Shadow of a Doubt [1943]

shadow of a doubt

Welcome!  The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is SHADOW OF A DOUBT, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten and Macdonald Carey — with a fine performance by Hume Cronyn.

The script was a collaboration between Thornton Wilder, Sally Benson and Alma Reville (Hitchcock’s wife).

Of course Hitch makes a cameo appearance in the film, and Wikipedia tells you when to look for him:

Alfred Hitchcock appears about 15 minutes into the film, on the train to Santa Rosa, playing bridge with a man and a woman (Dr. and Mrs. Harry). Charlie Oakley is traveling on the train under the assumed name of Otis. Mrs. Harry is eager to help Otis, who is feigning illness in order to avoid meeting fellow passengers, but Dr. Harry is not interested and keeps playing bridge. Dr Harry replies to Hitchcock that he doesn’t look well while Hitchcock is holding a full suit of spades, the best hand for bridge.

 

http://youtu.be/4kwHB7s3T9k