The Maladjusted Black Sheep, Part 1

Pasadena police were stunned when, early on the morning of April 19, 1947, 18-year-old Gerald Snow Welch arrived with the dead body of a girl in his car. He coolly announced to officers his “purpose in life has been completed.” What in the hell was he talking about? Who was the girl and how had she died?

doloresGerald identified the girl as his 16-year-old sweetheart Dolores Fewkes. He claimed that he and Dolores had planned to die together but he survived due to a miscalculation on his part. He had brought only two bullets with him to the deserted picnic grounds in the San Gabriel Mountains where the couple planned to leave this world behind. He thought two rounds would be enough, but when Dolores failed to die immediately after the first bullet entered her head, he fired again. The second round entered her skull about a half an inch from the first, but it didn’t kill her either. She started to scream and wouldn’t stop. He told police that he “finished her off” by battering her to death with the stock and barrel of the .22. “If only I had taken more bullets…” he told police. Once Dolores was dead he put her bloody body into his car and drove her to the police station where he confessed.

He told investigators that he felt “no sorrow, no regrets” about the slaying and was convinced that Dolores was surely in heaven awaiting his arrival. “There won’t ever be any change in my feelings. I loved her and she wanted to go with me into the next world. It will be much happier and better there.” Then he explained that he’d rather let the State kill him but: “…I would kill myself if I got the chance.” Gerald appeared to be in no hurry to make good on his threat, he sat on the bunk in his jail cell and stared at the ceiling.

gerald jailHe admitted that when he originally contemplated suicide he had no intention of taking Dolores with him but: “She said she couldn’t stand to be left behind and we decided to go together.”

What had driven the teenagers to consider such drastic action? Were teenage angst or raging hormones to blame? Gerald explained that his suicidal thoughts were the result of a crisis of faith coinciding with his medical discharge from the Navy where he had served “three unhappy months.”

no regrets headline

“I began to doubt a lot of things which had been told me in Sunday School and church and I began to do some investigations. I went to the library and I read philosophers–lots of them–Plato, and Schopenhauer and Emerson. I found in Schopenhauer a positive justification for suicide.”

Strange as they were Gerald had given his reasons for wanting to die, but his contention that Dolores couldn’t bear to be left behind needed further examination. Everyone who knew the Montebello High School student said that she was a happy girl with a lot to live for. Did she have a secret dark side that she had revealed only to Gerald? Had she willingly entered into a suicide pact with him, or was he lying?

NEXT TIME: Dolores’ family disputes Gerald’s story that she wanted to die with him and accuses him of cold-blooded murder.

Film Noir Friday: Out of the Past [1947]

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Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.

 I was trolling the internet for a film for a film for tonight and I found OUT OF THE PAST, one of my all-time favorites! I’m not sure why it is suddenly available, but I plan to take full advantage of it.  This film is a perfect example of film noir–great script, incredible cast (Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer, and Kirk Douglas) and fabulous director, Jacques Tourneur.  If you have never seen this before I suggest that you drop everything and spend approximately 97 minutes in film noir heaven (or perhaps more appropriately, hell).

Enjoy the film!

 TCM says:

In the small town of Bridgeport, California, gas station owner Jeff Bailey is tracked down by Joe Stefanos, a former business associate, who tells him that his boss, Whit Sterling, wants to see him the next morning in nearby Lake Tahoe. After he reluctantly agrees to meet with Whit, Jeff reveals to his trusting girl friend, Ann Miller, his recent past: Three years earlier, while working as a private detective in New York, Jeff, whose real name is Markham, and his partner, Jack Fisher, are hired by gambler Whit to find Whit’s girl friend, Kathie Moffat. According to Whit, Kathie shot him and then disappeared with $40,000 of his money. Assured by Whit that Kathie will not be harmed, Jeff locates her in Acapulco and immediately falls in love with her.

And that, my friends, is when the shit hits the fan.

https://youtu.be/Gd_ow4KXn0Q

Film Noir Friday: The Guilty [1947]

guilty_xlg

Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.

Tonight’s feature is THE GUILTY [1947],  directed by John Reinhardt and based on a story by Cornell Woolrich; the film stars Bonita Granville, Don Castle, Regis Toomey, John Litel, and Wally Cassell.

Enjoy the movie!

TCM says:

In New York City, Mike Carr goes into Tim McGinniss’ bar to wait for Estelle Mitchell, whom he hasn’t seen since Estelle’s twin sister Linda was murdered six months earlier. He then recounts for Tim the story of Linda’s death: Mike’s roommate, Johnny Dixon, who was in the Army with him, frequently suffers spells in which his nerves collapse. Linda and Johnny are very much in love, but Estelle, a vamp, is determined to have Johnny for herself.

http://youtu.be/VPiic-jjesw

Film Noir Friday: The Web [1947]

Film Noir Poster - Web, The_01

Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.

Tonight’s feature is THE WEB starring Edmond O’Brien, Ella Raines, William Bendiz and Vincent Price.

Enjoy the film!

TCM Says:

At a big city train station, Martha Kroner greets her father Leopold after his release from prison, where he served a five-year term for counterfeiting bonds. Kroner is disappointed that his former associate, wealthy businessman Andrew Colby, has not come to welcome him home. Unknown to Kroner, Colby’s henchman, Charles Murdock, watches him from the shadows.

 

http://youtu.be/ni8U6gD2fh8?list=PLEF00711AD0520D86

Film Noir Friday: Framed [1947]

FRAMED_1947

Welcome!  The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.

Tonight’s feature is FRAMED [1947] starring Glenn Ford, Janis Carter, Barry Sullivan and Edgar Buchanan.

Enjoy the film!

WIKIPEDIA says:

Mike Lambert, unemployed mining engineer, arrives in a small town with a bang when the brakes fail on the truck he’s driving. After meeting seductive Paula at the La Paloma Cafe, he finds himself in trouble with the law. On the basis of a few burning glances, Paula pays his fine and finds him a room, but her motives are not what they seem. Mike lucks into a job with miner Jeff Cunningham, but against his will he’s drawn ever deeper into Paula’s schemes.

http://youtu.be/pyCF0QQtqyE

Film Noir Friday: Shoot to Kill [1947]

shoot-to-kill

Welcome!  The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.  Tonight’s feature is SHOOT TO KILL [1947] starring Russell Wade and Susan Walters. Enjoy the film!

TCM says:

During a high-speed car chase with the police, Marian Langdon Dale, her husband Lawrence, the newly elected district attorney, and Dixie Logan, an escaped murderer and crime boss, crash, and Larry and Logan are killed. Later, reporter George “Mitch” Mitchell visits Marian at the hospital and asks her to explain how she and Larry ended up in Logan’s car.

 

And therein lies the tale…

 

http://youtu.be/r5RldPZvq8w

 

Tune in tomorrow for the conclusion of the deranged tale: A DEATH ON MULHOLLAND DRIVE!

Film Noir Friday: Johnny O’Clock [1947]

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Welcome! The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat. Tonight’s feature is JOHNNY O’CLOCK, directed by Robert Rossen and starring Dick Powell and Evelyn Keyes and Lee J. Cobb.

TCM says:

Johnny O’Clock, a sharp-witted New York gambling house overseer, has many “friends” in the city’s underworld: His associates include Pete Marchettis, Johnny’s senior partner and owner of the lavish casino he operates, and Chuck Blayden, a crooked, trigger-happy cop who is investigating other gambling houses in town. After trying to cut into the casino’s profits and warning Johnny under threat of death not to interfere with his intention to become Marchettis’ partner, Blayden ends his relationship with cigarette and coat check girl Harriet Hobson, then disappears. Harriet is later found dead of an apparent suicide in her apartment, and Inspector Koch begins his investigation into her death by questioning Johnny.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtSHVJmAhLE&feature=share&list=PL8324F6C554122985

Film Noir Friday: Fear in the Night [1947]

Fear_in_the_Night-Poster2

Welcome!  The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open! Grab a bucket of popcorn, some Milk Duds and a Coke and find a seat.  Tonight’s feature is Fear In The Night and stars Paul Kelly, DeForest Kelley, Ann Dorn, and Kay Scott. The movie is based on a story Cornell Woolrich (under the pseudonym of William Irish). Cornell Woolrich’s stories and novels have made terrific films: Rear Window,The Bride Wore Black, and Phantom Lady. Fear In The Night was directed by Maxwell Shane.

 TCM Says:

Bank teller Vince Grayson wakes from a nightmare in which he and an unknown woman murdered a man in a strange, mirrored room. Only a dream…but Vince finds that he has physical objects and bruises from his “dream.” His cop brother-in-law dismisses his story…until the family, on a picnic, takes shelter from a thunderstorm in a deserted mansion containing that mirrored room. Is doom closing in on Vince?

Film Noir Friday: Lured [1947]

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The lobby of the Deranged L.A. Crimes theater is open. Visit our snack bar for a fizzy beverage, a big bag of popcorn and a candy bar. Tonight’s feature is LURED, starring Lucille Ball, George Sanders, and Boris Karloff.

Wikipedia says: “Sandra Carpenter (Lucille Ball) is an American who came to London to perform in a show, but now is working as a taxi dancer. She is upset to find out that friend and fellow dancer Lucy Barnard (Tanis Chandler) is missing and believed to be the latest victim of the notorious “Poet Killer,” who lures victims with ads in the newspaper’s personal columns and sends poems to taunt the police.”

Since Lucille Ball is the star of the LURED, let’s begin the evening with a Tex Avery cartoon featuring another stunning red head, SWING SHIFT CINDERELLA.

Now, enjoy the feature!

Hollywood Cinderella, Part 1

madge portraitMarjorie Massow was an Iowa Falls, Iowa girl — but she didn’t want to be one all of her life. She had big dreams so she moved to Hollywood to make them come true.

Even pretty girls like Marjorie could find Hollywood tough going; it wasn’t always as simple as getting off a Greyhound bus and into a starring role, no matter what the movie magazines said. Instead of working on a sound stage, Marjorie found herself ringing up lunch specials at the cash register in the 20th Century-Fox commissary. Even though she wasn’t working as an actress, Marjorie saw movie stars every day and she felt sure that  she’d catch a break — after all everyone knew that Lana Turner had been discovered in a Hollywood drugstore.

Lana Turner

Lana Turner

The Iowa City girl got lucky, and in 1944 she was plucked out from behind the cash register and cast for a role in “Take It or Leave It”. Marjorie only made a couple of films for 20th Century-Fox, but they were enough to whet her appetite for more.

By 1946 Marjorie had adopted the stage name of Madge Meredith and she was working for RKO. She was cast opposite Tom Conway in “The Falcon’s Adventure”, and later that year she appeared in “Trail Street” with Randolph Scott, Robert Ryan, and Anne Jeffries.

RKO terminated Madge’s contract early in 1947, and in a few short months her life went from bad to much worse.

hollywood cinderella soughtOn July 2, 1947, Madge was in the headlines, but it wasn’t because she was starring in a film — the actress was being sought for questioning in a kidnapping case!

Nick Gianaclis, Madge’s business manager and a restaurant supply man, had filed a complaint in which he said that he and his body guard, Verne Davis, had been kidnapped, beaten, and taken out to Lopez Canyon from where they had managed to escape. According to Gianaclis, he and Davis had caught the man who was watching them off guard and relieved him of his weapon. They ran to a ranch house and called the cops.

In Nick’s statement to Capt. W.T. Deal and Det. Sgt. S.W. Robinson of the L.A. County Sheriffs Department, he said:

“It was about 9 a.m. Monday, Davis and I were on the way to work. When we reached the bottom of the hill at Laurel Canyon Road, we met Marjorie Massow driving a new maroon convertible couple. She motioned to us to turn around and follow her up the hill to the house. So we did.”

The house to which Nick referred in his statement was in the Hollywood Hills, and it was at the center of a nasty dispute between he and Madge.  About 200 yards from the house, Nick told officers, the actress turned her car to block the road. Gianaclis said that when he stopped a third car drove up behind him.

“There they are! Go get them!” Nick quoted Madge as saying.

Three men got out of the car to the rear, Gianaclis said, and while two of them covered the victims with guns, the third administered a beating with a blackjack.

“We were ordered into the rear of the car. While we were being driven for more than an hour, we were struck from time to time–just about every time we moved. When we finally stopped in a hilly area, the man called Jim taped our eyes. Then they made us crawl over some rocks and through heavy brush. They left a guard to watch us.”

Gianaclis said his wallet containing $85 cash and a cashier’s check for $4,000 had been stolen.

Police later located Gianaclis’ allegedly stolen wallet at his home, but then Davis said that the men had taken the money from Gianaclis’ pocket NOT his wallet. The minor inconsistency in Nick’s story didn’t seem to bother anyone, and a warrant was issued for Madge’s arrest.

Madge surrendered herself to Sheriff’s deputies Lt. Pete Sutton and Sgt. M.W. Skelly at the Public Library. The meeting had been arranged by her attorney, Ward Sullivan

When she was questioned, Madge told a tale that was quite different from the statements given by Gianaclis and Davis.

She said that Nick had threatened her many times about ownership of the house, and that he had arranged a meeting in the Hollywood Hills on the day of the kidnapping to discuss the property rights.

Madge told the police that on the way to the meeting, as she was driving up the steep, winding road, she became frightened when she noticed that she was being followed by a car driven by Nick. When she reached the meeting place in Laurel Canyon, Madge said that Nick forced her automobile to the curb. When she attempted to escape, she said that he threatened her with a length of pipe.

MASSOW

Madge’s standing mugshot.

KLINKENBERG

Damon Klinkenberg

Nick filed a formal complaint against Madge and three men for robbery, kidnapping and assault with a deadly weapon.

The men in the kidnapping case had been identified as: Damon William Klinkenberg, 21, a cook; Albert W. Tucker, 29, nurseryman, and James Alfred Hatfield, 33, former Beverly Hills policeman.

Madge was released on $5,000 bail, her co-defendants were held in the County Jail in lieu of $10,000 bail each.

The case against the alleged kidnappers went to trial. Davis and Gianaclis testified that they’d heard one of the men say that the trio were “getting $2,000 from Massow for this job.”

Madge's standing mugshot.

James Hatfield

Nick sobbed out his testimony saying:

“They beat me with blackjacks and guns even though I told them I would given them money if that was what they were after”. They taped my eyes and forced me to lie down in the back of their car and drove away with me.”

Madge was called to testify about her dispute with Nick over the house:

“I fell in love with the house, but was $5000 short on the purchase price. I called on several of my friends for aid and finally Nick said he would put up $5000 to complete the transaction. I took out two life insurance policies  to protect Nick’s investment.”

Madge testified that Nick had duped her. He’d gotten her to sign a deed to the house, not a mortgage, so that he would be part owner. She’d trusted him, she said, and he had betrayed her.

Albert Tucker

Albert Tucker

Ward Sullivan and Abbott Bernay, Madge’s attorneys, said she was “scared to death” after Nick threatened to “get her” over the lawsuit involving the home at 8444 Magnolia Drive in the Hollywood Hills.

The trial lasted for four weeks and on December 12, 1947, the jury of 11 women and 1 man returned guilty verdicts for each of the defendants.

Madge was found guilty of five felony charges involving the kidnapping of Nick. Two of her co-defendants, Albert Tucker and Damon Klinkenberg, were also convicted. A fourth defendant, James Hatfield, the former Beverly Hills cop, was found guilty only on the possession of a deadly weapon charge.

Madge said she had been framed. She was remanded to County Jail pending a new hearing, but the motion for a new  trial was denied.

Madge was sentenced to from 5 to life in Tehachapi; Albert Tucker was sent to San Quentin; Damon Klinkenberg received three 60 day County Jail sentences to run concurrently, and James Hatfield was confined for just 30 days.

Imposition of Madge’s prison sentence was postponed indefinitely pending the outcome of an appeal; however, she was incarcerated in County Jail while she waited.

Finally, in October 1948, Madge was freed on a $15,000 bond; she had served 11 months in jail. Of her time in the County Jail she said:

“At first I was on ‘hard time’. That is when you feel you didn’t get a fair break. Persecuted. You know–‘we wuz robbed’ sort of thing.”

“Sometimes you couldn’t even imagine what it was like to walk down a street or take a drive out by the ocean.

But I like to work and I looked forward to getting to be a trusty so I’d have something to do. I volunteered for any kind of work. Then one day they took me to the sewing room–I, who never could sew–and put me to work. I can sew now all right.”

“And pretty soon I was on ‘easy time'”.

To add to her woes, while she was out pending an appeal, Madge was sued for $65,732 for damages by one of her alleged victims, Verne Davis. The civil suit charged that “under Miss Meredith’s direction” three men had pulled him out of a car, beat him repeatedly with their fists and a blackjack over a two hour period, and taped his eyes and mouth shut before releasing him.  Nick testified on Verne’s behalf.

Madge and her three co-conspirators were ordered to pay $4,050 in damages to Verne V. Davis.

In March 1949 Madge lost her appeal in the kidnapping case, and on April 25, 1949 Madge surrendered to police to begin her term in Tehachapi Women’s Prison.

Madge told reporters:

“I know in my own heart I’m innocent of any crime and some day, someone will believe the truth about what I say.”

NEXT TIME:  The truth will out.